Crédachttps://credac.fr/enSun, 20 Sep 2020 00:00:00 +0200Lire les dernières actualités du CrédacLa vie des tableshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/la-vie-des-tableshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/la-vie-des-tablesSun, 20 Sep 2020 00:00:00 +0200

Ideas often spring up from a walk, from a swim in the crystal-clear water of a lake, from eating a slice of bread and jam, during a sleepless night, while playing a Memory game, or reading inspiring texts in which new, solidly built ideas emerge. When they arise, one has to pinch them hard enough to carry them all the way to the work table. Whether it’s a kitchen table, a workbench or a desk — tables embody the place where intuitions take shape.

The desire to invite artists to exhibit works imagined for such surfaces sprung up a while ago. It expands my reading of Lucy R. Lippard ’s texts [^Lucy Lippard, Get the message? A decade for Social Change, NY, Ed.Dutton, 1984.], wherein the American activist and feminist writer and Art Historian points out that women artists all too rarely enjoy the physical space that is required to create, and end up having to work in domestic spaces — mainly on their kitchen table.
This idea was also nurtured by an artwork by Hugues Reip, entitled 0,25 (1990-91) [^Presented during Hugues Reip’ solo show, L’Évasion, at the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry — le Crédac in 2018.], which consists in a series of 25 tiny sculptures made spontaneously using the inside of bread, rubber, paper clips, nails, and which were presented to the public on formica top kitchen tables, the domestic symbol of the 1950s.

This exhibition seems necessary to us after this spring deprived of social interactions, exchanges and proximity, It has the value of a project of resistance and attention to domestic and private artistic practices. This lockdown period has forced creators to return to modest and DIY artistic practices, while for others this is a regular practice. Focusing on the relationship that artists have with their “work tables” - refuge, playground or passage - we are inviting artists to submit their pieces as one sends a letter. They may have been conceived during the recent period of confinement or in response to this invitation, they may be spontaneous, modest, constructed or sophisticated.

La vie des tables (The Life of Tables) therefore adjusts itself to reality. It adapts to the constraints connected to distancing and it updates, both playfully and out of necessity, Mail Art, which emerged in 1962 with the creation by Ray Johnson of the New York Correspondence School of Art. As the name suggests, Mail Art circulated mainly by post and in a spontaneous manner. This “movement” launched the notion of attitude as an object — a founding concept of contemporary art in the 1970s, which still remains relevant today.

The pieces proposed by the artists will be exhibited at le Crédac on a myriad of tables: kitchen tables, work tables ; Formica, wooden, or plywood tables ; tables that are painted or in the rough ; coffee or dining tables ; square, rectangular or round-shaped ones, all constituting a landscape that is evocative of the work of thinking and of intimacy, that of the model, the sketch or the completed form.

Jardin d’hiverhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/jardin-d-hiverhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/jardin-d-hiverFri, 24 Jan 2020 00:00:00 +0100

The show at Le Crédac called Jardin d’hiver (Winter Garden) followed on Sudden Spring and Predicted Autumn,[^At the Bildmuseet, University of Umeå, Sweden (2018), and the Musée d’art contemporain de la Haute-Vienne, Château de Rochechouart (2018).] a program that the artist pursued in time with the seasons. Lempert designed an installation of vitrines like botanical cases but holding photo compositions that play out a vegetal motif as the prints of a nature hanging on the promise of renewal. An Ipomoea tricolor (the morning glory), a detail from Botticelli’s Spring, and the floral print of a cotton shirt are elements that form a visual narrative through the play of free conceptual or formal associations fashioned by the artist.

Silver prints, invariably in black and white on matt baryta paper, are selected from a large corpus of photographs taken daily from life and revealed in his own laboratory. The format of each photograph is determined in relation to its environment: its context of appearance, a display case or an exhibition wall, and the set of images in which it is inscribed.

Simon Boudvinhttps://credac.fr/en/residencies/simon-boudvinhttps://credac.fr/en/residencies/simon-boudvinTue, 31 Dec 2019 00:00:00 +0100

Artist Simon Boudvin participates in the first research residency at the Manufacture des Œillets for a period of 10 months. From his studio, the artist has undertaken a photographic work on the city, crossing his interest in architecture and urban ecology, in the spirit of the one carried out since 2011 in Bagnolet and Montreuil with the mapping of the development of a population of ailantes. Beginning in November 2019, his residency will take the form of a photographic survey in the housing estates of the Ivry Public Housing Office (OPH), their spaces for meetings, conviviality and associations, between domestic cells and public space. The artist’s work is based on encounters with the actors of the territory and explorations, on the spot and in the plans, to unearth and represent these spaces. From the time of exploration in the districts of Ivry to the time of the workshop devoted to image editing, reflection and public meetings, this residency is an opportunity to share Simon Boudvin’s view of the city.

Carte Blanche à Frédéric Bonnethttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-frederic-bonnethttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-frederic-bonnetWed, 30 Oct 2019 00:00:00 +0100

À l’occasion de J’aime les rose pâle et les femmes ingrates, une exposition collective de l’artiste Sarah Tritz pensée comme un dialogue entre ses productions récentes et des oeuvres qui nourrissent sa réflexion, l’artiste donne carte blanche à Frédéric Bonnet pour proposer un programme vidéo en écho à son exposition.

Carte Blanche à François Aubarthttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-francois-aubarthttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-francois-aubartFri, 13 Sep 2019 00:00:00 +0200

À l’occasion de J’aime les rose pâle et les femmes ingrates, une exposition collective de l’artiste Sarah Tritz pensée comme un dialogue entre ses productions récentes et des œuvres qui nourrissent sa réflexion, l’artiste donne carte blanche à François Aubart pour proposer un programme vidéo en écho à son exposition.Dans les années 1990, Ellen Cantor (1961-2013), qui cherche à transcrire les émotions engendrées par la vie affective, est confrontée à une question : comment exprimer sincèrement les sentiments sans verser dans les clichés ?

Elle y trouve une réponse en manipulant les images stéréotypées produites par les industries du divertissement. Dans Within Heaven and Hell (1996), la voix-off de Cantor raconte son histoire d’amour avec un homme, l’exaltation de leur rencontre et la violence de leurs déchirures. Elle est accompagnée de scènes de la comédie La Mélodie du bonheur (1965) et du film d’horreur Massacre à la tronçonneuse (1974). Pour raconter la façon dont une relation est vécue, Cantor utilise des images produites pour provoquer l’allégresse ou la frayeur.
Pour réaliser Madame Bovary’s Revenge (The Lovers) (1995), elle utilise des scènes du film Les Amants (1958). Ce film qui narre la vie d’une femme quittant l’ennui de sa vie partagée entre son mari et son amant lorsqu’elle rencontre un troisième homme, use d’ellipses pour évoquer l’acte sexuel. Cantor les complète d’extraits du film pornographique Behind the Green Door (1972). L’artiste détourne ainsi les tropes de la pornographie pour raconter une histoire d’amour.
C’est mue par une même réflexion, nourrie de féminisme, sur la façon de montrer l’acte sexuel en cherchant une alternative aux représentations stéréotypées, violentes et dégradantes, de la pornographie, qu’elle réalise Club Vanessa (The London Tape) (1996). Dans cette vidéo, Cantor explique qu’elle rêve d’un monde futur dans lequel toute personne pourrait avoir plusieurs partenaires sans que cela n’engendre de jalousie. Elle raconte ensuite plusieurs histoires personnelles : une partenaire qui, lors d’un rendez-vous a invité un homme ; son amie Vanessa qui aimerait avoir un petit ami à qui Cantor répond qu’elle est un garçon. Ces propos, face caméra, sont accompagnés d’autres scènes, qui montrent Cantor faisant l’amour avec une femme puis avec un homme. Ses histoires et ses expériences personnelles, à priori réalistes, sont mêlées à des images extraites de films et sont parfois montrées diffusées sur une télévision, troublant ainsi la distinction entre vie réelle et représentation. Cantor trouve ainsi un moyen pour exprimer autant ses pensées sur l’amour, que les émotions engendrées par ses rencontres, et le fait de faire l’amour.

François Aubart

J'aime le rôse pâle et les femmes ingrateshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/j-aime-le-rose-pale-et-les-femmes-ingrateshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/j-aime-le-rose-pale-et-les-femmes-ingratesFri, 13 Sep 2019 00:00:00 +0200

Sarah Tritz has dreamed up a personal art show in which her new pieces are exhibited in dialogue with works by 29 other guest artists, a display whose connecting thread is the body as a container, like a box whose idiom is one of its main tools.
The show links what are normally viewed as two distinct forms of pleasure, allied and inseparable. There is erotic pleasure (glamour) as well as a cognitive one (grammar).
Tritz brings together artists whose works openly and shamelessly call to us with an obvious physicality, like Liz Craft’s sculpture Me Princess, or the double self-portrait Gehirnstroeme (Brainwaves) by Maria Lassnig, an artist who has repeatedly taken herself as her subject yet has avoided complacency of any sort. Many of these artists dare to embody neurotic thinking and show a reciprocity between the attitude of the artist at work and what their works illustrate.

For her show, Tritz has selected a number of outsider artworks borrowed from the collections of LaM (the Lille Métropole musée d’art moderne, d’art contemporain et d’art brut), which bring to light the construction of a line of thought. They are drawings and have a cathartic value, characteristically featuring writing, symmetry, and a clarity in the distinct outlines of the drawn shapes. These motifs are treated as given conceptual elements that attest to the power of language, however ungraspable it proves to be. 

Beyond the generations and backgrounds of the artists, both outsider and contemporary, Tritz has been putting together an eclectic corpus of work that looks like a network of esthetic complicities that reveal no divisions.

Further into the show, the artist exhibits face to face a series of new pieces envisioned as an interior, both mental and domestic. Inspired by the preciosity and fantasy of Art deco furniture, the artist has designed – drawing on the artisanal know-how of several fields – a buffet with all sorts of anthropomorphic embellishments, whose doors with their stylized expressions, and vulva-shaped handles, open onto an inner theater done in bronze. The artist has molded a box-garden like the model of a projection space, an inner garden.

Theatricality – long present in Tritz’s work – is expressed by a family of headless hand-sewn marionettes, for example, or a mini peepshow, or Theater Computer, simple jury-rigged computers boasting keyboards with unintelligible alphabets and equipped with two-sided screens. On their “windows,” the artist represents the demons and desires of characters guided by their needs, primitive, sexual and greedy.

The exhibition benefits from loans from the Centre National des Arts Plastiques; Centre Pompidou, Paris / Musée national d’art moderne - Centre de création industrielle; LaM - Lille Métropole musée d’art moderne, d’art contemporain et d’art brut; Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris.
Works presented in the exhibition are susceptible to hurt the sensitivity of some visitors, especially young audiences. 

Traversées collectiveshttps://credac.fr/en/residencies/nour-awadahttps://credac.fr/en/residencies/nour-awadaSun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 +0200

With the support of the Region Île-de-France and echoing the research developed by Nour Awada at the Laboratoire des Arts de la Performance (LAP), Crédac is partnering with the Fernand Léger high school in Ivry-sur-Seine to imagine a residency with the students on the theme of transmission. During the school year, the artist and the students work on the realization of a performance and develop a process of documentation through writing and photography, which will lead to a publication at the end of 2020.

24 heures à Hanoïhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/24-heures-a-hanoihttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/24-heures-a-hanoiFri, 19 Apr 2019 00:00:00 +0200

The past is sometimes unable to intercede in the present. But on the contrary, in Hanoi, time’s circle seems to have been distorted into an imperfect curve, like the country’s sinuous and humid geography. Past and present confront each other in a ceaseless, futile tug of war. No future emerges on the horizon. Dreaming or awake? These twenty-four hours are a theater of apparitions, souls who will revisit our present existence, turtles who will recite poems while we remain prisoners of the discord of a country now transfixed by the paradoxes of its past.
This dead end, closed off centuries before to the history of Vietnam at the moment when it lost its original language—can the enchanted eyes of an outsider finally find a way out?”

— Excerpt from the narration of the film 24 hours in Hanoï.

Thu Van Tran, born in 1979 in Ho Chi Minh City, drew on her own experience as a Vietnamese women living in France to explore the question of physical and cultural displacement, especially through episodes in colonial history. Here that personal experience is transcribed into an initiatory journey and the reality of a political context. For 24 hours in Hanoï she conceived an unusual metaphor inspired by the spirit of the eighty-two wise turtles, the guardians of Vietnam’s poetic and scholarly heritage, located in Hanoi’s Temple of Literature. The artist made an installation using wax sculptures to restore their presence. Their mute presence is paired with an experimental 16mm film and a fresco pierced with shards that punctuate the exhibition’s stories and poetry. As in all of her work, here she introduces aesthetic experience as a modality of a possible rereading of history, wonderment as a counterpoint to violence.

D’un sud-est à un autre sud-esthttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/d-un-sud-est-a-un-autre-sud-esthttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/d-un-sud-est-a-un-autre-sud-estFri, 19 Apr 2019 00:00:00 +0200

Dans le cadre de son exposition personnelle 24 heures à Hanoï, l’artiste Thu Van Tran a été invitée à concevoir une programmation spécifique. Elle a convié 4 artistes vidéastes vietnamiens, et un artiste grec au sein d’un programme intitulé D’un sud-est vers un autre sud-est.

Des attentionshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/des-attentionshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/des-attentionsFri, 18 Jan 2019 00:00:00 +0100

Among the bustling crowds in some Renaissance paintings, peripheral figures point their index finger toward the scene’s pulsating heart, as if to intercept and guide our wayward gaze. First drawn in the margins of manuscripts and then adopted as a typographic convention, a small hand with an outstretched index finger (a manicule or digit) came to serve as a kind of annotation to signal a text’s key passages to hurried or distracted readers. Then, increasingly an instruction, this hand became pure signage: an arrow, blinking light and advertizing injunction. The little hand became legion, calling attention to a myriad of signals emitted by the press, radio, photography, movies and television.

Long before our media environment evolved into a digital cosmos, Walter Benjamin noted the generalization of “reception in distraction,” indicating “major perceptual shifts.” On the Web, we still have the icon of a little hand, now wearing a white glove, to highlight hovering hyperlinks that can be activated by a click, while our fingers on a touchscreen make searches that may turn out to be inspired or dead-ends. Multiple ruts, whether captive or emancipated, mark the pathways along which we move, driven by self-interest, curiosity, astonishment and associative delirium.

In the spirit of an “ecology of attention” defined by Yves Citton in 2014, the exhibition des attentions asks itself: “What do we let traverse us?” in our digital environment? The ten artists brought together for this show express a fluctuating, wandering attention, freed of both technological determinism and monetizable standardization. Instead of a permanent state of alert demanding instantaneous receptivity and proactivity, they sketch out a furtive, variable vigilance, simultaneously dreamy and rebellious, deaf to siren songs but attentive to context, the people around us and our environment. Far from the performance imperatives dictated by the logic of quantification, their work embraces an “emancipating distraction,” a floating attention that can focus by itself.

Dans le clair obscur du languagehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/dans-le-clair-obscur-du-languagehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/dans-le-clair-obscur-du-languageTue, 01 Jan 2019 00:00:00 +0100

Thu Van Tran’s work incorporates a wide range of practices: sculpture, writing, film and installations. From her migrant perspective, she explores the pitfalls of globalization, embracing language and matter in a common creative process. The Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac is devoting a solo exhibition to Thu Van Tran for the first time, after having collaborated with her twice in group exhibitions; “Expériences Insulaires” in 2006, and “L’Homme de Vitruve” in 2012.

As a sculptor, Thu Van Tran has created monumental works (a boat perched on top of a postmodern building made by Ricardo Bofill in Noisy-le-Grand, a flying buttress at the Red House in Paris) with modest materials: wood, paper, wax, etc. But the raw material of his works is one of the most evanescent, fiction. The stories to which Thu Van Tran gives tangible form are of postcolonial inspiration and her works are linked to the intertwined history of Vietnam and France.

Pour une esthétique de l’émancipationhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/pour-une-esthetique-de-l-emancipationhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/pour-une-esthetique-de-l-emancipationTue, 01 Jan 2019 00:00:00 +0100

Far from rereading art history by anachronistically applying to it the term “queer”, used positively in militant circles since the end of the 1980s, Pour une esthétique de l’émancipation seeks to show how the writing of art history has diminished the importance of artists’ political and affective commitments and rendered the social significance of their works inoperative. By imagining new friendships between artists of the past, Isabelle Alfonsi brings out a feminist and queer lineage for contemporary art. Twentieth-century artistic practices are thus placed in the context of activism in defence of homosexual rights and the formation of a radical feminist and anti-capitalist critique. Claude Cahun and Michel Journiac cross-reference the history of American minimalism, as seen through Lynda Benglis, Lucy Lippard and Yvonne Rainer. The wars of representation waged during the AIDS crisis are read through the prism of the works of Felix Gonzalez-Torres, José E. Muñoz’s concept of disidentification and the cultural activism of the Boy/ Girl with Arms Akimbo group in San Francisco in the 1980s.

The text is accompanied by numerous illustrations, including reproductions of works by Michel Journiac, Claude Cahun, Marcel Moore, Lynda Benglis, Lucy Lippard, Robert Morris, Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Akimbo. So many images whose circulation has sometimes been compromised by the predominance of a patriarchal and heterogeneous vision of art history.

Reflexologieshttps://credac.fr/en/publications/reflexologieshttps://credac.fr/en/publications/reflexologiesTue, 01 Jan 2019 00:00:00 +0100

Material and its intrinsic qualities are at the heart of Nina Canell’s (born 1979, Sweden) sculptural lexicon. The artist points out the plasticity of the transfers - of energy, matter, data, thoughts - that surround and connect us, using the exhibition space as a field of correspondences. Her works result from the presence of concrete materials and immaterial forces that allow the emergence of fluctuating and unexpected relationships.

Pour les pieuvres, les singes et les Hommeshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/pour-les-pieuvres-les-singes-et-les-hommeshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/pour-les-pieuvres-les-singes-et-les-hommesFri, 14 Sep 2018 00:00:00 +0200

John Cage’s thinking has profoundly influenced and moved a whole generation of artists and has participated in defining conceptual art. In the exhibition tout le monde in 2015, we presented a work by William Anastasi entitled Sink (1963-2010).This work, a square steel plate of 50 cm wide and 2 cm thick, was given by Anastasi to John Cage for his birthday, with the protocol of putting water on its surface every day until his death. Gradually, rust would alter and erode the steel plate.

Introducing living things into art is a way of anchoring creation in the real world, which is “not an object”. Shimabuku’s work began in the 1990s and followed the work of Joseph Beuys or Jannis Kounellis, who in Europe introduced live animals in art in the 1960s and 1970s, or Ágnes Dénes, on the American continent, who placed the protection of the environment at the centre of her actions, or Robert Smithson concerned about the idea of entropy and growing disorder.

“To discover the meaning that circulates among things, between what composes them and what they compose, in us, outside us, with or without us […].” [^Tristan Garcia, Forme et Objet. Un traité des choses, PUF, Paris, 2010.] This is the promise of Shimabuku’s work, who, by choosing the unpredictable as to the final form that his work will take, defines the process as a priority over the formal result. Meticulously produced and documented, his sculptural works, writings and photographs, videos and performances, articulated together or separately, reveal the modalities of their design and the important part left to chance. The works produced by Shimabuku are based on a profound attention to his environment, to Japan where he lives and works, but also to the different contexts in which he is invited to exhibit.

Shimabuku’s actions are positive. These are gestures of care, offering, and sometimes even reconstruction, which are not without evoking kintsugi, a traditional Japanese technique known since the 15th century, which consists in restoring ceramics or porcelains with gold or silver. These scars thus sublimate the accidents that have punctuated the life of objects. In the larger room, through an action he carried out on the Japanese coast, Shimabuku straightens up the landscape after it has been devastated. He creates a conversation between the film of this action, Erect and fragments of two houses destroyed in July in the Gagarin social housing estate in Ivry-sur-Seine. Where Robert Smithson’s Upside Down Tree (1969) was a transcendental gesture (which consisted in replanting a tree in the ground with the roots towards the sky), Shimabuku sets up the possibility of a second life. Concern about climate change and the need to become aware of our natural environment remind us of the fragility of ecosystems. Also the question of the living world and of animism is central today and regularly finds its place at the heart of the Crédac project. Mathieu Mercier had made in 2012 Untitled (couple of axolotls), a kind of diorama, at the crossroads of the vivarium and aquarium, which raised the question of the evolution of species; in 2015 we invited Michel Blazy to showcase his Collection of avocado trees (started in 1997) in the collective exhibition tout le monde. In 2017, Nina Canell introduced slugs into the heart of one of her installations made of “disarmed” electrical cabinets, for her solo show.

For more than twenty years, Shimabuku has been one of the most recognized among this generation of artists interested by the living and animism. For him as for Pierre Huyghe, Tomás Saraceno or Nina Canell, the exhibition space has been transformed into a refuge for a new ecosystem of organisms.

Claire Le Restif
Exhibition curator

L’Évasionhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/l-evasionhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/l-evasionFri, 20 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0200

Sculptor, draftsman, musician, video filmmaker, photographer, Hugues Reip (born in 1964) freely draws his inspiration from works in the tradition of alternative-world fiction, so-called social science fiction, from the early 20th century, as well as the beginnings of animated cinema and the history of scientific illustration. His art is fueled as much by a certain ‘90s underground rock as it is by the infinite variety of land and sea fauna and flora.

Viewers of Reip’s work travel through a landscape in which perception and illusion are two major experiences. In his pieces, each tree, each object seems to conceal a fantastic divinity in some form of surrealist syncretism.

Hugues Reip is a gardener of the supernatural. In his show called L’Évasion (The Escape), which combines past masterpieces and new works, we get to watch the dream of a butterfly, for example, that flits among clouds of dust. Black Sheeps (2014) is a group of five spinning mechanisms. They are sorts of dust planets and make their revolution in Crédac’s large main gallery. Further along we witness the creation of a fantasy island that is planted with a tree from which immortal flowers and other plants dangle. The Eyeland (2018) is a colorful island that is overlooked by a watchful eye, suggesting Odilon Redon, or putting us in mind of the guardian balloon from the mythic TV series The Prisoner (1967), where no escape is possible. Playing as always with artifice, Reip places in his unserious worlds rocks that are sometimes miniscule and sometimes oversized, and creatures from the deep that exist right beside simple matchsticks. And in Windowblow (2018), he superimposes reality on illusion through a trompe-l’oeil image of the city landscape outside the window.

The series Noirs desseins (Dark Designs – 2012-2016) shows the artist’s fondness for the history of scientific illustration and the work of Lucien Rudaux (astronomer, 1874-1947) and Ernst Haeckel (biologist, 1834-1919), along with the film special effects of Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013); while Mushbook (2008) displays his reading of the hallucinatory work of the Beat Generation. Nova Express (1964; first French edition, Christian Bourgois, 1970) is the title of the book that is central to the piece and is incidentally the name of Reip’s first rock band.

He shows off his references, both to Joseph Cornell (1903-1972) through a diorama in which he plays with surrealist techniques, juxtaposing fantastic and dreamlike elements; and to Öyvind Fahlström (1928-1976) for assemblage and collage in a form of poetic invention. Considered his first work of art, 0,25 (1990-1991) is made up of tiny sculptures that could almost be spontaneous drawings. His entire vocabulary is already in place, the vocabulary over which floats the esthetic of the artist H. C. Westermann (1922-1981), which combines Surrealism, the spirit of Dada and Folk Art. Seen through the prism of the macro- and the microscopic, his worlds harbor the patient reality of work, the compulsive collections of small found or jury-rigged objects, and the mysteries of the art studio.

Claire Le Restif
Curator of the exhibition

L’Iguanehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/l-iguanehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/l-iguaneSat, 20 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

Crédac’s regular visitors will recall Louise Hervé & Clovis Maillet from L’Homme de Vitruve (Vitruvian Man), the 2012 group show that also included the work of this artist duo. It was our first time working with the two and they exhibited a selection of objects that had once belonged to Maurice Thorez (leader of the French Communist Party from 1930 to 1964 and member of France’s National Assembly from Ivry). The collection is normally conserved in Ivry’s Municipal Archive. The man who entitled his autobiography Fils du Peuple (Son of the People) and claimed that the book was a tool for emancipation became the starting point of both a science fiction story, L’un de nous doit disparaître (One of Us Must Disappear) and a performance piece, which was produced by Crédac for the occasion.

Our interest in their work has not waned since and we have closely followed the direction their research has taken. The current invitation is premised on putting together an anthology-like exhibition to underscore the breadth and depth of the two artists’ creative process. Hervé and Maillet are presenting part of their latest undertaking while also revisiting a selection of their earlier pieces, which they have reconceived in new displays to show them in a different light. The duo wanted to articulate the show in two acts, La Salle sans nom (The Nameless Gallery) and Rien n’est dit (Nothing Is Said), comprising a retrospective program of medium-length films (part of Crédakino) and performances, which are scheduled for the exhibition’s entire run.

L’Iguane (The Iguana) is the display of a method. Is it because one of the artists is a graduate of the art school of Cergy and the other holds a doctorate in historical anthropology from EHESS that they go about imagining their work in a singular way? They explore episodes taken from history such as Pythagorean instruction, the holidays and fraternal songs of the Saint-Simonians, or the practice of jiu-jitsu by suffragettes, drawing from them points for thinking about the engines of social revolution and the ways knowledge is transmitted. These elements lend themselves well to being reenacted or reconstructed, and the artists combine them with fictional and historical narratives. Throughout there appears as well a genealogy of their own practice, along with a questioning of the present age.

The overall design of the display they have created recalls their “reasonable interest in the diorama” [^« Un intérêt raisonnable pour le diorama », épisode] and illusionistic devices that are animated by projected and synchronized images. The display elements they deploy suggest both the theater, in a concept in which actor and viewer share the same space, and mystery, through references to magic and esoteric initiations. And yet the two artists also leave the back of the decor on view for all to see and reserve certain concealed zones that open onto the landscape.

In a museum-like space, Louise Hervé & Clovis Maillet feature an imaginary collection of works that run from the early 20th century to today, which Fleury-Joseph Crépin, Madge Gill, Alexandro Garcia, and Augustin Lesage supposedly created under the influence of spirits and extraterrestrial entities that they maintained had lavished visions and technical advice on them. Hervé and Maillet also tried their hand at the same experience, producing facsimiles while guided by the kindly “spirits” of their entourage. This is in fact their latest project, developed in Northern France and Belgium. They have created links between Fourierist architecture, the spiritualist’s art, and a strange encounter with an iguana, the reptile that gives its name – an enigmatic title to say the least – to both the show and a film being shot at the time of the show, an initial threeminute excerpt of which is included in the exhibition.

An open window in the space affords us a glimpse of an unnamed room, a parallel area whose hidden door can only be entered by the public during performances. Isn’t this also a kind of staging that blurs the borders between the space of the illusion and what lies behind the scenes, scientific reconstruction and entertainment, knowledge and the marvelous?

For several years now Louise Hervé & Clovis Maillet have been conjuring up the iguana, whose relationship to time differs from ours. Through its eyes, retrospection can be anchored in the present as much as it can constitute a view that looks to the future. This antediluvian animal, almost stonelike with its usually slight, practically imperceptible movements, mirrors the artists’ interest in the living as a vestige of a time that is not altogether past.

« In a café near the port of Dunkirk lives an iguana. We met it a few years ago,. We were staying in the youth hostel between the beach and the port, which was then hosting the annual illusion congress; dozens of magicians were rehearsing their acts, sporting amulets around their necks. We were the only people incapable of doing magic tricks. That evening we were eating at the café with a sailor. The iguana stared at us for a long time. It moved only a little, so precisely and slowly that our human gestures appeared disordered. The iguana moves in another dimension, we thought, where time is slowed down and perceptions are modified. Perhaps it is always living in the future. »[^ in Louise Hervé & Clovis Maillet, Attraction Etrange, 2013]

Claire Le Restif & Sébastien Martins
Curators of the exhibition

Royal Garden Xhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-xhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-xMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

rgx it is the tenth royal garden, it precedes and survives the exhibition, which makes it a kind of independent, thoughtful and talkative matrix. doing gymnastics in the garden side means experimenting some other reading exercises, inspired as much by the book wheels of the Renaissance as by the mechanical analysis of digitized content: reading all senses, in all of their senses. walking garden side is meeting the possible ghosts and avatars of the works displayed in the exhibition des attentions, and transposed here in the mode of stepped evocations. available at any time of the day or night, rgx unbewitches and reveals hidden associations, fomented by an editorial team masked in pink-gradiva ten: laurence cathala (artist), brice domingues & catherine guiral (officeabc, graphic designers), vincent maillard (developer), hélène meisel (curator).

ABC B.Ahttps://credac.fr/en/publications/abc-b-ahttps://credac.fr/en/publications/abc-b-aMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

This monograph consists of a collection of texts and critical essays in the form of an alphabet primer. Using key words, twelve art critics, curators and writers have written a text commenting on the work of Boris Achour. The book also includes an iconographic set providing an overview of the artist’s work.

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-bischhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-bischMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-canessonhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-canessonMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-coindethttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-coindetMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-dedobbeleerhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-dedobbeleerMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-fromenthttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-fromentMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-jottahttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-jottaMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-kunathhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-kunathMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

INDEX 1987-2017https://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-rittenerhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/index-1987-2017-rittenerMon, 01 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100

In 2017, the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac celebrates its 30th anniversary alongside the artists, critics, administrators and audiences who have been at the heart of its action in favour of creation. In this context, the production of a book appeared necessary, making it possible to convene the memory of everyone, works, exhibitions, conferences and projects conducted by artists in schools. It is also about documenting a rich past of contemporary creation that has left a lasting imprint on the French and international artistic scene.

This book aims to present itself as a resource tool, offering an exhaustive set of archives concerning the history of the Crédac. The book, intended for an audience of amateurs, students and professionals, consists of an iconographic walk that retraces 30 years of creation, and a corpus of texts. Faithful to the history of Crédac, which has been written through the projects and people who have contributed at different levels to the development of its activity, the book brings together among its authors: artists, institutions, art critics, exhibition curators, representatives of trustees, administrators

Carte blanche à Stéphanie Cottinhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-stephanie-cottinhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-stephanie-cottinTue, 31 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +0100

C’est l’histoire d’un harpon, de la manière dont il est devenu un crayon, et avec lui, tout le reste. Arvo Leo a centré son film Fish Plane, Heart Clock (2014) sur l’artiste inuit Pudlo Pudlat (1916-1992) — en positionnant le crayon de Pudlat comme point d’appui autour duquel un contexte beaucoup plus large s’accumule.
À l’origine vivant comme chasseur sur l’île de Baffin dans l’Arctique canadien, une blessure a amené Pudlat à déménager à Kinngait, une hameau colonial. En 1956, le ministère des Affaires du Nord et des Ressources naturelles du Canada crée Kinngait Studios, qui fournit aux Inuit un espace, du matériel et un enseignement au dessin et à la gravure. La coopérative West Baffin Eskimo a été créée en 1959 pour promouvoir les ventes et les expositions d’art inuit dans le sud du Canada et à l’étranger. L’imagerie de Pudlat reflète son environnement en constante évolution, combinant des animaux ou des igloos avec des avions ou des hélicoptères, et souvent en se transformant l’un en l’autre.
Travaillant de manière prolifique dans le Studio, les gravures et sculptures de Pudlat ont été largement diffusées par la Coopérative. Pourtant, dans Fish Plane, Heart Clock, Leo se concentre sur la collection de Pudlat, qui compte plus de 4 000 dessins et peintures, la partie la plus privée d’une production artistique couvrant quatre décennies. La musique jouée par les résidents de Cape Dorset ajoute une autre strate, et est aussi présente que l’image.
Fish Plane, Heart Clock est plus démonstratif et lyrique que documentaire ou neutre, car Leo interprète la logique artistique de Pudlat et sa forme visionnaire d’oraison graphique. Leo voit son film comme une tentative de ne pas parler ’de’ Pudlat, mais de parler ’tout près’ de Pudlat. En d’autres termes, la proximité qu’il offre est un siège au centre d’une orbite, à partir de laquelle une collection inédite d’art et une constellation de relations culturelles, économiques et politiques sont mises en évidence.
— Chris Fitzpatrick & Post Brothers

STRETCHhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/stretchhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/stretchFri, 08 Sep 2017 00:00:00 +0200

In 2010 the Kunstverein of Nuremberg and Crédac, working with the curator Kathleen Rahn, jointly mounted the show Mental Archaeology (Matti Braun, Thea Djordjadze and Jean-Luc Moulène). Along the same lines, we are now featuring the work of Alexandra Bircken, the inspiration behind our latest joint exhibition. Crédac is the most recent address for a show that has traveled to Hanover’s Kunstverein and the Abteiberg Museum of Mönchengladbach in Germany. And importantly, it is the first solo show devoted to Alexandra Bircken in France. Crédac has also contributed to the accompanying catalogue.

What grabs and holds viewers’ attention in Bircken’s sculptural work is its plastic force, topicality, and clear desire to adopt a gender neutrality that one might characterize as “androgynous.” All of which has surfaced again and again in Crédac’s program of exhibitions and events over the last few years.

There is a great deal to say about the artist’s career up to this point. She was interested in artmaking via fashion, studying in the 1990s at the prestigious Central St Martins College of Art and Design in London, and later created her own label with Alexander Faridi. Heavily influenced by these experiences, the work Bircken is now pursuing is very much bound up with current political affairs. “How can you be indifferent to the news coming at us every day,” she observes in her interview with Kathleen Rahn, Susanne Titz and me for the catalogue. Her art also conjures up the things that have long haunted her, throwing light on the workings of an object, its private reality, the way it is constructed or assembled, be it a piece of clothing, a motorcycle, or a firearm. Each of them has its particular instructions for use and characteristics, its own identity, just as the body has its own workings.

So when the artist makes an almost surgical cut in the process of creating some of her sculptures from existing objects, not only does Bircken deactivate them, she enhances them. While she views her treatment of the body or clothing as a leitmotif, her experiments with materials suggest an interest in the study of the body and skin as an organ, outfit, cellular structure, and an extremely vulnerable border between inside and outside. Dummies, clothing, damaged motorcycle suits are exhibited, with cuts and incisions like cutaway models. All of the spatial situations mounted by Bircken point up the interactions between humans and machines, a central, omnipresent subject that has been constantly evolving since the Industrial Revolution and which has come to include at least a century later the cyborg (from cybernetic organism), that human being who has been fitted out with mechanical grafts, and the replicant (first heard in the film Blade Runner), which is more akin to the human clone than the robot, unsettling the notion of the human condition and the question of gender.

The overall title of the three STRETCH exhibitions speaks for itself. We wear clothes and we build houses for our skin is too fragile to protect us completely. What touches us, what gets under our skin in Alexandra Bircken’s work is that it is our permeability and penetrability that make us humans.

Claire Le Restif
Exhibition curator

Hugues Reip, Phantasmata (1995–2009)https://credac.fr/en/artistic/hugues-reip-phantasmata-1995-2009https://credac.fr/en/artistic/hugues-reip-phantasmata-1995-2009Thu, 07 Sep 2017 00:00:00 +0200

Depuis le début des années 1990, Hugues Reip (né en 1964) développe une œuvre prolixe traversée par un imaginaire « archéomoderniste ». Ses vidéos, sculptures, installations élémentaires et découpages forment des tableaux oniriques enfantins et rock’n’roll. Certains procédés techniques et formels hérités des origines du cinéma (Méliès, Keaton) et des avant gardes artistiques du XXe siècle (Fischinger, Kandinsky) mêlés à des artifices bricolés, donnent naissance à ses expériences filmiques, souvent de très courte durée.
Le terme d’origine grecque phantasmata revêt plusieurs sens : une apparition ou un spectre, une création de l’imagination, une hallucination, ou encore une image mentale d’un objet réel. Ce titre choisi par Hugues Reip pour la sélection de films projetés dans le Crédakino traduit précisément le monde à la fois féerique et inquiétant de l’artiste, qui met en scène une autre réalité, entre abstraction et magie, que l’on pourrait qualifier de réalité relative. « Je me souviens des gravures accompagnant les récits de Jules Verne, qui, rendant l’irréel véritable, évoquaient un monde qui aurait un corps, un temps, un espace visible différent du nôtre… mais au même endroit » explique Hugues Reip. Visions hallucinatoires, jeux d’échelle, science-fiction : les Parallel Worlds de l’artiste ouvrent leurs portes.

Dolphin Dandelionhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/dolphin-dandelionhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/dolphin-dandelionFri, 21 Apr 2017 00:00:00 +0200

Nina Canell’s exhibition Dolphin Dandelion, her first solo exhibition in France, presents her characteristic material left-overs and processual debris, carefully produced to meet the post-industrial context of Credac.

The production of space, or a visualization of imagined space, induces horizon—a vanishing line, a curve in passing—the search for an elusive or hypothetical element that artists call “landscape”, “space”, “territory”. Communicating involves subordinating forms to the content of the message in order to be understood. This is not the case with art, which is close to silence, the tangles of language, the codes by which artists sometimes lead us into the meanderings of meaning. To think and communicate from the space one produces, is not always limited to visual data. This space that comes from a variable set of metaphorical or concrete elements, which delimit a mental plane within which tensions are materialized, where perspectives and dead ends appear.

Nina Canell produces spaces. For instance, she considers her exhibition according to the orientation of the rooms of Crédac: South West, South East and East again. This detail underlines both the way the artist considers space as a central element as well as the meteorological dimension of her own work. Temperature, atmosphere and time are all important factors.

[…]

Nina Canell explores the interval, micro phenomena and the at times imperceptible relation between objects. Her work often involves several forms of radiation, sine waves, electricity: all symbolically “charged” with different associations of “affective” forms. Recently described as a kind of “anthropology of energy”, it points to the plasticity of transfers - of matter, data, thoughts - which surround us. She uses the exhibition space as a field of correspondences: the place of what happens, has happened, or could happen.

Nina Canell maintains a curious relationship with objects, close to animism. She says that she often observes at length how they behave and interact with each other, redefining then in the exhibition the event occurring only between objects.

Her work is strongly linked to moving and impalpable subjects, such as dislocation, fluidity, transmission and its corollary disconnection.

Claire Le Restif
Exhibition curator

« Rappelle-toi de la couleur des fraises »https://credac.fr/en/artistic/rappelle-toi-de-la-couleur-des-fraiseshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/rappelle-toi-de-la-couleur-des-fraisesFri, 20 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +0100

Whether in her writing, production, or choosing to work collectively, Lola Gonzàlez creates works that display a propensity for authenticity, spontaneity, and fluidity, solid values that cement emotional ties. She mainly works in video art, repeatedly featuring a group of young people in natural settings with grand family residences to be seen somewhere in the picture. It is impossible to know who these people are or what holds them together, and yet their activities appear to be driven by a common dream that is infused with a certain idealism.
In Veridis Quo (2016), the group has come together in a house by the sea on the eve of some event for which they seem to be preparing with firearms training while wearing a blindfold. Their day ends with a silent dinner around a platter of shellfish punctuated by the crack, clack, and crunch of broken carcasses. In the morning, the group, now blind, is guided to the shore by their two observers, who alone have not lost their sight. They then wait, weapons in hand, their empty gaze fixed on the horizon, while the event is suspended for the time being.

With the show “Rappelle-toi de la couleur des fraises” (“Remember the Color of Strawberries”), visitors can discover the artist’s latest production, which was shot in December 2016 and conceived as a video installation in which two film spaces intermittently merge. The first video shows two lovers who have washed up at the foot of a house by the sea. They are taken in by three young men who see the world in black and white only. In the house the couple must confront different trials that will lead to a change in their perception of color. The emotional and chromatic vicissitudes experienced by the couple are punctuated by a soundtrack composed by Alexandre Bourit, one of the artist’s friends, which is heard issuing from the second space. This latter space seems to be a way of passing between two diegetic realities.

Gonzàlez has taken the opportunity of her solo show to create a shared moment with her network of art colleagues, friends and family, who provide support and have an influence on her output. She has invited several others to join her, including Nicolas Rabant (born in 1988), whose dyed nets conjure up the reflections of dawn and dusk on the surface of the sea; Accolade Accolade (Jenne Pineau and Paul Mignard, both born in 1989), a duo of painters who explore symbolist pictorial territories together; and Pascale Gadon-Gonzàlez (born in 1961), who has been studying and photographing for some twenty years various species of lichen, an organism resulting from the symbiosis of two biological entities which invites us to think of otherness as a complementarity. Through these invitations, Lola Gonzàlez lends visual form to the process of exchange and the preponderant role played by the community of affection and cooperation in her artistic practice.

Retrospective My Eyehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/retrospective-my-eyehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/retrospective-my-eyeFri, 20 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +0100

As an artist and curator, Corentin Canesson has dedicated his time to painting, music and curating. His practice adheres to various protocols that he imposes on himself as playful obsessions. He sees painting as a spontaneous pleasurable act through which he can summon mixed references to the history of 20th- and 21st-century art. For the current exhibition, he has done a series of abstract acrylic and oil paintings in a given format (195 x 130 cm), pointing to the gestures of Eugène Leroy, Bram Van Velde and Philip Guston. Experiencing this uninhibited painting also involves a soundtrack, one created by his group, called The Night He Came Home. The album visitors hear was recorded for the show and each of the record sleeves is hand-painted by the artist himself; it plays in a loop in Crédac’s main gallery, which has been reimagined as a soundstage.

This “secondhand” painting—it should be read alongside the artist’s assimilation of painters he loves—doesn’t stop Canesson from engaging in true plastic experimentation and formal unity beyond the exercise of citing or reappropriating others’ work. The heritage in this case, designated and openly espoused, allows the artist to take over an area of painting that is already well established and clearly marked off while permitting the expression of a sincere and singular sensibility. In the teeming corpus of this highly prolific artist, certain periods, series, even whims stand out. For instance, there is the leitmotif of the bird (known to be inspired by both the naturalist paintings of the American ornithologist John James Audubon and the sculptures of the Finistère sculptor Jean Pierre Dolveck), which is often alone and hemmed in by the picture frame, stuck in layers and layers of paint that seem to weigh down on its movements. In 2015, following a residency at Les Chantiers, Canesson focused his solo show at the Passerelle Contemporary Art Center in Brest on the myth of Samson and Dalila. Both blocking and boosting communications beforehand, the artist himself painted the posters that were later placed in billboards around the city, conveying even before the show opened a range of visual translations of the Biblical story.

Retrospective My Eye: The title of both the show and the album is a straight-up homage to Robert Wyatt. It comes from the words of Gharbzadegi, one of the pieces on Old Rottenhat, the fourth album, a solo, self-produced work that the English musician brought out in 1985. The Night He Came Home—another reference, this time to John Carpenter’s 1978 film Halloween—is even a cover version; it can be heard in the show.

Royal Garden 9https://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-9https://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-9Sun, 01 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +0100

A scene, a character, a tegument? Have you ever looked a worm straight in the eye? Bibliomania invites you to follow Andy and your instincts to the other side of the apple. When loved objects become magnets, you’ll finally know why worms don’t come easy.

STRETCHhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/stretchhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/stretchSun, 01 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +0100

The STRETCH exhibition, in which some sixty objects illustrate the different phases of Alexandra Bircken’s work, was designed specifically for the Kunstverein Hannover, the Museum Abteiberg in Mönchengladbach and the Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry - le Crédac in Ivry-sur-Seine.

This book presents variants of the installations from the first exhibitions in Hannover and Mönchengladbach, as well as a documentation of the processes, which introduce the artist’s working methods and her research on materials.

Estefanía Peñafiel Loaiza, Remontageshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/estefania-penafiel-loaiza-remontageshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/estefania-penafiel-loaiza-remontagesTue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Remontages (Ivry-sur-Seine, 2014) a été réalisé par l’artiste durant la préparation de son exposition l’espace épisodique présentée au printemps 2014 au Crédac. La vidéo se concentre sur l’horloge de la Manufacture des Œillets. Stoppée depuis la fermeture de l’usine à la fin des années 1970 (depuis ponctuellement remise en fonctionnement), elle contient en elle à la fois le symbole du temps et de la mémoire. Possédant un double cadran, elle était visible depuis la cour en arrivant et depuis l’usine pendant la journée de travail. L’artiste restitue le processus de réparation par l’horloger et sa mise en fonctionnement pour la durée de son exposition au Crédac.

Carte Blanche à Elfi Turpin : In the Eye of the Shadow-Machinehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-elfi-turpin-in-the-eye-of-the-shadow-machinehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-elfi-turpin-in-the-eye-of-the-shadow-machineTue, 18 Oct 2016 00:00:00 +0200

In the Eye of the Shadow-Machine est un programme de films qui laisse affleurer une recherche menée par Elise Florenty et Marcel Türkowsky autour de différentes expérimentations de communications possibles entre êtres humains et non humains au Japon. Avec In the Eye of the Shadow-Machine, les artistes se penchent ici plus spécifiquement sur le Bunraku — une forme théâtrale dont les personnages sont représentés par des marionnettes de grande taille, manipulées à vue par des opérateurs masqués et habillés de noir.
Ce programme s’ouvre sur le film court Shadow-Machine qui dévoile une constellation de personnages, plantes, animaux et machines, isolés dans une dense nuit d’été, et partageant le sentiment d’être étrangement liés les uns les autres, comme s’ils étaient guidés par une même force externe, collective et menaçante. Si Shadow-Machine s’inspire du Bunraku, il propose une réflexion à la fois anxiogène et libératrice sur la domination d’un auteur sur son acteur.
Le second film de ce programme rentre dans l’œil du premier. Conçu dans la conspiration de la même nuit, il déplie de courtes histoires issues des coulisses du théâtre Bunraku révélant un dispositif narratif complexe qui sépare la musique de la voix, la voix du corps, la tête des membres. En prenant ses distances avec la représentation, ce film observe comment les opérateurs, tels des ombres mouvantes et souveraines, tour à tour donnent vie et la reprennent.

PROJECTION ET RENCONTRE AVEC ELFI TURPIN, ELISE FLORENTY ET MARCEL TÜRKOWSKY Jeudi 17 novembre à 19h

The Blue One Comes in Blackhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/the-blue-one-comes-in-blackhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/the-blue-one-comes-in-blackFri, 09 Sep 2016 00:00:00 +0200

A major artist on the contemporary Canadian art scene, Liz Magor (born in 1948; lives and works in Vancouver) finds her ideas in human beliefs, reactions, and behaviors, especially when they have something to do with the material world. Magor is interested in the social and emotional lives of ordinary objects, being particularly fond of materials that have since lost the luster of their use or their function from an earlier time. Selecting them for their capacity to contain and reflect stories, like personal and collective identities, the artist points up a resonance that goes beyond their simple utilitarian function via transformations and shifts in context or perspective.

Magor’s art practice began forty years ago. This long period has witnessed great changes in artmaking, from the dematerialization of the object to its rematerialization, from a movement away from the studio to its recent reaffirmation and a renewed interest in materials and making. Throughout this whole period, the artist has maintained her studio practice, specifically questioning the things that share the same space-time as her own body. In the catalogue of her recent retrospective at MAC, the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal [^Liz Magor, 2016. Catalogue of the show Habitude at Museum of Contemporary Art, Montreal (22 June - 5 September 2016)], she has gone, she says, “from words to the visible, from the idea to the object” for “it was a long process and it was in the studio that this change took place. Nowadays I need the concrete space of the studio to examine the world. It isn’t enough to just look. I need to transform things to better capture and understand the constituent properties of the materials and processes that form the objects of the world. Since all of these things already bear a social stamp, it is a bit as if I was bringing scraps of the world into the studio.”

Thanks to this experience, Magor decided to explore and absorb the world, to experience it before beginning to conceptualize. “For my use objects can be divided into two categories, those that come from the world and those that I produce in the studio.” The objects she chooses to make a part of her work are at the end of their expected life, dirty, rebellious, devalued, old fashioned, stupid. She traces their slow deterioration in connection with the domestic realm, then takes them into her care and slowly brings them around to a new attraction.

“What interests me is the influence of what is fashioned in the studio on what is simply found. By a mysterious phenomenon, found objects truly come to life when they are in the presence of the sculptural representation of something ordinary.”

Her works, which she says are designed, created, and polished by the play of contradictions, seem to restore the torment but also partake of the vitality of existence. By working from hyperrealist casts of day-to-day objects or pieces of clothing, mending and protecting objects chosen for their obvious disuse and obsolescence, realizing negatives of objects or facsimiles (two processes connected with reproduction), Magor puts us on alert. Through this awakening of an anonymous material world, a certain history of our modern culture can be read, from property to the need for protection and accumulation, to the ambiguity and inconstancy of the desire that connects us with objects. The artist creates and keeps a “photograph” of objects for a long time by putting an abrupt end to the process of corrosion and collapse. For sculpture has quite a lot to do with time and Magor’s sculpture, which is endlessly negotiating with “oxidized” matter, has to do with the idea of putting an end to time and to death. With these new associations between objects, Magor recreates life without creating new stories since she doesn’t want to lend particular meanings to her assemblages. There is no romanticism in her approach, maybe a slight nostalgia only. Nor is there any “regionalism” since she chooses her materials where she works.

Magor knows that the viewer doesn’t always make the difference between a real thing and a sculpture. She looks for that space of error between the manufactured and reality precisely where a disconnection with reality can play out.

Olivier Dollinger, The climate control and the summer of lovehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/olivier-dollinger-the-climate-control-and-the-summer-of-lovehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/olivier-dollinger-the-climate-control-and-the-summer-of-loveThu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 +0200

Le film repose sur une action unique menée par une performeuse plongée dans un décor se jouant des codes du studio d’incrustation à fond vert, utilisé pour produire les effets spéciaux. Le costume et le masque que porte la performeuse, opèrent des similitudes avec la figure du spectre dans les premiers films muets, son action se réduisant à produire et maintenir en apesanteur une simple bulle de savon au dessus d’une table de verre. […]
Olivier Dollinger, 2016

La Vie Héroïque de B.S. : Un opéra en 3 acteshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/la-vie-heroique-de-b-s-un-opera-en-3-acteshttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/la-vie-heroique-de-b-s-un-opera-en-3-actesTue, 24 May 2016 00:00:00 +0200

Dans cet opéra-vidéo, Hoël Duret met en scène le parcours d’investigation d’un personnage de fiction nommé B.S, designer fantasque et héritier maladroit des principes rationnels issus de la modernité. Conquérant, celui-ci accepte de relever un ultime défi : redessiner l’œuf de poule.
L’esthétique résolument sixties oscille entre bricolage et design, fourmillant de références aux créations industrielles de l’après-guerre, et annonce déjà la faillite de la pensée moderniste fascinée de son héros. Les trois actes ont été filmés dans autant d’expositions conçues comme des plateaux de tournage (Frac Pays de la Loire, Mosquito Coast Factory et Zoo Galerie).

Jeudi 2 juin à 18h45 : Projection et rencontre avec l’artiste.

Michel Aubry, Rodtchenko à Parishttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/michel-aubry-rodtchenko-a-parishttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/michel-aubry-rodtchenko-a-parisWed, 04 May 2016 00:00:00 +0200

En 1925, Alexandre Rodtchenko est chargé d’aménager le pavillon de l’URSS à l’Exposition Internationale des Arts décoratifs et industriels modernes. Durant son séjour à Paris, il écrit à sa femme Varvara Stepanova notamment sur sa vie à Paris, donnant une foule d’observations précises et critiques sur la société de cette époque.
Le film s’est construit progressivement depuis mars 2003 par des tournages successifs, généralement associés à des expositions du Club ouvrier que Michel Aubry a reconstruit et mis en musique. Dans le film, Alexandre Rodtchenko, incarné par l’acteur David Legrand, évolue dans le Paris contemporain sur les traces de l’artiste constructiviste découvrant des lieux restés inchangés, comme Versailles, le Cirque d’hiver, l’Hôtel Star-Etoile, l’Olympia et le Grand Palais.

Jeudi 12 mai à 18h45 : Projection et rencontre avec l’artiste.

Ce projet a été sélectionné par la commission mécénat de la Fondation Nationale des Arts Graphiques et Plastiques qui lui a apporté son soutien.

Carte Blanche à Ana Jottahttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-ana-jottahttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/carte-blanche-a-ana-jottaFri, 08 Apr 2016 00:00:00 +0200

Documentaire dédié à Ana Jotta tourné en 2009.

TI RE LI REhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/ti-re-li-rehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/ti-re-li-reFri, 08 Apr 2016 00:00:00 +0200

Ana Jotta has been elaborating one of the most exciting and singular bodies of work on Portugal’s art scene of the past few decades. While she mostly works as a painter, she also collects and gleans all sorts of things, injecting new life into the objects, writings and finds of others as well as her own. Making is the perennial watchword in the development of her work, which is as modest and spare as it is copious.

A Portuguese daily recently published a long profile of her entitled “Story of a Cat without a Master.” Indeed, Ana Jotta has no taste for what is dominant, classified, or ordered by anyone other than herself. Obeying only her own orchestration, she follows her many paths, routes and circles. She readily defines herself as irrational and fond of the unclassifiable, the inexhaustible, the immoral.

In the gallery devoted to the Js, the totemic sculpture called Genealogic Tree (undated) is characteristic of her practice. Suggesting a living room lamp, the assemblage brings together light (artificial and filtered through a plastic bucket that has been repurposed as a lampshade), a shield from the parades that took place during the 1940 World’s Fair in Portugal, and a painting by Pedro Casqueiro. Crowning the whole, the head of a dog trophy-like sports a royal headdress of ermine. Beneath the finery of a personal coat of arms, the artist is having fun with the notions of style, discipline, and the individual creator in a practice that is fundamentally free.

Footnotes forms an inexhaustible reserve and matrix for the artist. This collection of objects, images, drawings, and souvenirs has taken shape over the years and continues to grow, reminding us of the importance of amateurism (with its roots in amare, to love) and its attachment to the “minor” arts. Conserved in her home, the series resembles a retrospective show of her life (consider Petit cirque [Little Circus], which contains a year’s worth of images shot with her mobile phone). The elements making up footnotes were carefully selected by the artist initially for the exhibition A Conclusão da Precedente at Lisbon’s Culturgest in 2014. Photographed for the occasion, they gave rise to a book, which in turn generated wallpaper. This sort of Wunderkammer, or cabinet of curiosities, the forerunner of the modern museum, mirrors both Ana Jotta’s working process and her art, which, like her own body, is in constant motion.

Each show is in effect a chance to read and reread her output, a chance to come up with a new way of displaying it. There is no distinction then between her art and how it is shown and arranged. It is often through lighter, transportable, even perishable arrangements that her works by turns vanish and reappear. Her most recent pieces are substitutes for the artworks remaining in the studio and printed on light, sheer, ghostly pieces of cloth.

Ana Jotta calls herself eccentric, that is, literally outside the center. She lives and works on the margins, where frail, sensitive things, things that are almost invisible, are ejected. It is in those neglected, yet familiar, spaces that she finds her material, pointing up the essential details. Regarding them, she speaks of “exclusive objects that are peculiar to each of us, liable to have a life of their own through their oddity, charm and antiform.”

Claire Le Restif
Exhibition curator

In parallel with the show, several Parisian institutions (the Jeu de Paume, the Théâtre de la Ville, the Grand Palais, the Cité de l’architecture et du Patrimoine, the Fondation Calouste Gulbenkian) are honoring Portugal’s arts scene as part of the Printemps Culturel Portugais.

Going Spacehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/going-spacehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/going-spaceFri, 15 Jan 2016 00:00:00 +0100

The odysseys Caecilia Tripp shares with viewers are bound up with the history of peoples’ migrations. Rendered as journeys as well as ascensions or celebrations, these movements are indeed constantly in motion.
Going Space begins with a sound piece that accompanies viewers as their own steps take on a mounting rhythmic movement towards the exhibition space itself. Like a parade or procession, which is a recurring code in the artist’s work, the show follows a certain thread throughout, that of a fluid geography which starts with the intimacy of portraits showing sleeping readers (Sleeping with Books, 2011-15), continues with an urban context and the reenactment of past performances (Last Song, 2015; Paris Anthem, 2008), and ends in cosmic music and a vortex that is drawn in chalk through the circular dance of several roller-skaters.
Scoring the Black Hole [^Scoring the Black Hole is produced by Lafayette Anticipation - Fondation d’entreprise Galeries Lafayette.
Guests : Chimurenga « Pan African Space Station »] is first a performance, then a cosmic musical composition inscribed on canvas and film. There is neither a beginning nor an end, only the infinite and the unknown. In We Are Nothing but Stardust (2015), the artist alludes to string theory and references the jazz saxophonist and composer John Coltrane. Coltrane played cosmic constellations in his improvisations, which have since been explored by the quantum physics research scientist Stephon Alexander. Scoring the Black Hole reveals and highlights our invisible ties.
Another journey is enacted with a “prepared” bicycle (Music for [Prepared] Bicycle, Score Two: New York, 2015), which starts from the Bronx, passes through Spanish Harlem, and pushes on as far as the Brooklyn Bridge, retracing the history of both the Young Lords, a radical social group founded by young Puerto Ricans in New York and Chicago in the 1960s, and the Black Panthers.
In any case, Going Space is about shifts and movements in history. The history of the construction, fluidity and exceeding of identities is indeed the cornerstone of Tripp’s work. Through the history of music and sound, she offers us some of the construction codes of a multiracial America reinvented through the imagery of hip hop and poetry (The Making of Americans, 2004).
Travel, wandering, being adrift in the world, these artistic and philosophical motifs run throughout the show. From the figure of the flâneur, that idle rambler of urban streets introduced in the early 20th century by the philosopher Walter Benjamin, who praised slowness as opposed to the acceleration of modern life and the expansion of cities, with a tortoise on a leash for a guide (The Turtle Walk, 2011). It is a critical point of view that was extended by Guy Debord in the 1970s with the concept of dérive, drift, which placed the individual at the center of thought, calling into question the meaning of public and private space in the age of capitalism.
In her show, highlighting the last ten years of her work, Tripp shows us that she is a true recorder of the world. She is fashioning a body of work that seems to be the bearer of a belief according to which each of us, in movement and action, has the power to change something. Of course she is creating works of art at a moment of crisis and protestation, when all the reference points and landmarks have been called into question since Ground Zero and following Occupy Wall Street, the Arab Spring and the surge of fundamentalisms of every stripe. Tripp doesn’t limit herself to merely documenting. She designs and records her performances out in the street, always in collaboration with someone else. She long ago abandoned the idea of the studio in order to directly engage with people. Poets, choreographers, musicians, philosophers, historians, physicists, and astronomers are the protagonists or companions in the participative processes that she herself conducts from Paris, Mumbai, New York, the Caribbean, and now Ivry.
She is an artist who is forever on the move, like the wheels of a bicycle whose spokes are the strings of a guitar (Music for [Prepared] Bicycles - bicycle sculpture, 2015), thus transformed into a musical instrument and a revolution.
Tripp is interested in protest movements, civil disobedience and anarchy. Those who defied racial segregation appear everywhere in her work, from the American writer Gertrude Stein and the jazz musician Miles Davis, to the activist Angela Davis and the boxer Muhammad Ali.
The artist is deeply inspired by the Caribbean poet Edouard Glissant, a close friend to whom she has dedicated several films (Making History, 2008), and it is “the poetics of relationship” that enables Tripp’s critical eye to be open to utopias, the invention of new languages, the revelation of dominated cultural codes, and the analysis of social imagery. Tripp is endlessly fascinated by going beyond the question of identity since, as she puts it, “we are not fixed identities.” Because, as Edouard Glissant stresses, “Nothing is True, everything is alive,” like the multiple sounds and identities that resonate in Going Space.

Claire Le Restif
Exhibition curator

Sans titrehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/sans-titrehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/sans-titreFri, 15 Jan 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Pour l’exposition Going Space, un cycle de films de Caecilia Tripp, pensé comme une séance de 50 minutes, est présenté dans le Crédakino.

En 2014, Caecilia Tripp a reçu le soutien de la FNAGP pour Music for (pre- pared) Bicycles Score 3, Cape Town, Afrique du Sud.

Royal Garden 8https://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-8https://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-8Fri, 01 Jan 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Figures is a construction game based on fragments of images, textures, materials and objects gleaned. Mathias Schweizer, a graphic designer, creates compositions - from an abundant matrix of elements passed through the prism of his scanner, or shaped according to his research - which are as many game boards for visitors. If he is at the origin of the first figure, it can then be modified at will by the visitor and left as it is for the next one.

Thierry Chancogne, graphic theorist and teacher, invited to react to these compositions, proposes a flow of reflections, which rubs shoulders with the game like a continuous flow of information. He writes a series of impromptus conceived as a diachronic study on the appearance of forms and images in the fields of architecture, painting and cinema.

Tout le mondehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/tout-le-mondehttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/tout-le-mondeFri, 11 Sep 2015 00:00:00 +0200

I’ve always liked billboards when they turn blue, that moment when all the messages are covered over. Those mornings in Ivry are my favorite, when the blue of the sky draws a little closer to the asphalt. It is that custom on the scale of the city in its entirety that has served as a template for the very architecture of this exhibition, with billboards replacing the usual display on gallery walls.

In order to extend the idea that the blue of the sky belongs to “everybody,” I have brought together twenty-two international artists [^With works from the collections of Centre National des Arts Plastiques, Centre Pompidou, Paris / MNAM-CCI, Frac Aquitaine, Frac Lorraine, Frac des Pays de la Loire and courtesy of the artists and the following galleries : Gaudel de Stampa, mor charpentier, Jocelyn Wolff, Dohyang Lee, Art : Concept, Marcelle Alix, Blum & Poe, gb agency, Anne-Marie & Roland Pallade, Peter Freeman, inc., Eric Dupont, Kamel Mennour.] who have been producing work over a period that stretches from the 1960s to the present. Although they may come from different generations, they all share in common gestures or actions that constitute fragile, even tenuous, works of art created with a certain frugality and attention to the surrounding context. They convey an anxiousness about our environment (Agnes Denes, Koji Enokura), ritual (William Anastasi), care of the living (Michel Blazy), the sublime (Guillaume Leblon), time (Nicholas Nixon), praise of slowness (Mélanie Counsell), walking (Helen Mirra), the poetic act (Gina Pane), ecological action (Hans Schabus), and revolt (Marie Cool Fabio Balducci). Others treat such themes as the collection (Jean Le Gac), collecting things (Dove Allouche, Bela Kolarová), the simple gesture (Lili Dujourie, Jirí
Kovanda), the urban gesture (Gordon Matta-Clark), preservation (Lara Almarcegui), anthropological recording (Marcos Avila Forero), writing (Marcelline Delbecq), and play (Roman Signer, Mathias Schweizer).

The show represents a modest inventory that conceptually is a herbarium rather than an atlas. Poetic, occasionally political, and pitched at a level that everyone understands, the works court neither heroism nor the spectacular, and yet they are extraordinary for the thoughts they spark or the position they adopt.

Focusing on “slight” gestures as opposed to the “over-the-top” ones that our screens transmit daily, the exhibition favors slowness, calm, immobility, even a form of banality, like so many perceptible connections that tout le monde addresses to “everybody”.

Claire Le Restif
Exhibition Curator

Modes & Usages de l'arthttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/modes-usages-de-l-arthttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/modes-usages-de-l-artFri, 10 Apr 2015 00:00:00 +0200

For some twenty years now, Delphine Coindet has been developing a sculptural language through collages and assemblages of widely varying materials and techniques, as well as arrangements of the exhibition itself, treating the display space as an open mise en scène. The inventiveness of her style, which generates an endless dialog with architecture and design, is articulated today around a broad palette of experimental works that includes the art exhibition itself of course, as well as theater design, performance, publically commissioned art, and the creation of radical furniture.

Crédac is proud to continue its long-term collaboration with Delphine Coindet, which goes back over a decade. This most recent project is part of an unusual work arrangement in association with CIRVA (the International Center for Research in Glass and the Plastic Arts, Marseille). In 2014 the two institutions, moved by a common desire, invited the artist to work with experienced artisanal glassblowers in a material that was entirely new to her practice, glass. The artist has come up with forms that take advantage of both the virtuosity of the craftsmen’s technical expertise and chance, the accidental, leaving room for the creation of a series of variations in terms of color and texture.

The title of the show, Modes & Usages de l’art (Modes and Uses of Art), may come as a surprise with its didactic character in the style of a user’s manual or an old-fashioned magazine. But questions concerning the function of art and its modes of production and representation lie at the heart of this exhibition project. The works presented at Crédac suggest useful objects that have been shorn of their utilitarian function and now display, for the visitor’s appreciation, their purely plastic power and symbolic weight. Playing on the vacillating ambiguity between art and design, the artist questions the heritage of domestic conventions that orchestrate the interiors of our living spaces. Transitional, narcissistic, ritual, what indeed are our connections with the objects around us?

Bruno Pélassyhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/bruno-pelassyhttps://credac.fr/en/artistic/bruno-pelassyFri, 16 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0100

An art center is not a museum but occasionally it has to become one. Thus, today, for the first time, Crédac has mounted a retrospective exhibition devoted to the living work of a deceased artist, Bruno Pélassy. A beautiful and fruitful collaboration played out around his oeuvre, with the unfailing support of the Pélassy family, the artist’s friends (Natacha Lesueur, Brice Dellsperger, Frieda Schumann), art critics and experts of Pélassy’s body of work (Didier Bisson, Florence Bonnefous, Marie Canet), generous collectors, and the art centers Passerelle in Brest, CRAC in Sète and MAMCO in Geneva. Between 2015 and 2016, these institutions will feature in turn exhibitions and events devoted to the artist.

The main aim of the Crédac show is to return to the spotlight the work of this singular French artist, who is etched in the memory of the artistic community but has yet to be discovered by the public at large. Pélassy produced his work in the context of the 1990s, a time of economic hardship and individual and collective traumatism having to do with the AIDS virus, but the decade was also one of artistic ferment in Nice, where he was close to the art school and art center of Villa Arson, then under the direction of Christian Bernard. His friends were the artists Jean-Luc Blanc, Brice Dellsperger, Natacha Lesueur, Marie-Ève Mestre, Jean-Luc Verna and “guardian” artists like Ben. He had his first exhibition in 1993 in Nice at Art:Concept. Pélassy did not attend art school. Rather, he studied textiles and jewelry, which eventually led to his working for the jeweler Swarovski, while from fashion design he was to borrow his processes, materials, and the techniques for shaping them. A do-it-yourself approach joined forces with painstaking work that employed glass and crystal, and the creation of jewelry went on right alongside his construction of cheap little mechanical creatures.

The works featured in the show were all created over a period of ten years. What is striking from the very outset is the diversity of the experiments, both esthetic and technical, which the young artist seemed driven to give form to like some irresistible impulse. There are the “Créatures,” silk and lace organisms moving about in aquariums; “Bestioles” (Bugs), a mechanical bestiary making a spectacle of itself; the portraits done in wax or pencil; his only video piece, Sans titre, Sang titre, Cent titres (1995), a kind of manifesto in which the magnetism of the video tape is gradually erased as it is reread over and over again, damaging the image until it disappears; and the “Reliquaires” (Reliquaries), which contain both pieces of jewelry and one of the artist’s jackets.

The Crédac show refuses to stake out a position that strives to ape a display the artist himself might have devised, but neither does it adopt an overly museum-like approach to presenting the work. Thanks to the present show, Bruno Pélassy’s output can be seen once again and now is part of what is most current and relevant in today’s art. The images to which it refers, the echo of the context in which it was created, and the use of metaphors and figures which it puts out into the world form a vast field of experimentation that allows us to fully measure the interest of this body of work, an oeuvre that won’t go out of fashion, that is somber and luminous, sophisticated and cobbled together, heartfelt and lucid, and above all free.


Claire Le Restif
Exhibition curator

Royal Garden 7https://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-7https://credac.fr/en/artistic/royal-garden-7Thu, 01 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0100

This seventh issue of Royal Garden offers a kind of ascension that unfolds with a series of documents, games and multiple experiments in public outreach.

We invited Boris Achour to appropriate the living part of the Public Outreach Bureau and the artist came up with a novel proposal that he developed through animated GIFs and a playful interface that goes over emblematic motifs and archives.

Royal Kinder Garden recreates, though only partially, the world of our outreach work, which we would like to be resonant, enlightened, and enthusiastic. Children and adults can replay these experiences of the eye, hand, and word online.

Bruno Pélassyhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/bruno-pelassyhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/bruno-pelassyThu, 01 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0100

Born in Laos in 1966, Bruno Pélassy has produced a baroque, funny and incisive body of work, including a manifesto film, Sans titre, sang titres, cent titres, on which Marie Canet draws to highlight the links between the work and the Aids virus, which won the award in 2002. Bruno Pélassy’s works are produced in an artisanal spirit of accumulation and a taste for fabrication; by their precariousness they walk against permanence. At the crossroads of jewellery and decorative objects, they are domestic things because, made at home, they value in their elaboration as well as in their content the intimacy of the making and its destination.

The Blue One Comes in Blackhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/the-blue-one-comes-in-blackhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/the-blue-one-comes-in-blackThu, 01 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0100

The Blue One Comes in Black offers a new contribution to the thinking around Liz Magor’s long standing practice by gathering newly commissioned critical texts and creative writing, as well as texts by the artist herself, some of which were previously unpublished.This book not only highlights important works from throughout Magor’s career but also present her latest work for the first time in a publication form.

The Registry of Promisehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/the-registry-of-promisehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/the-registry-of-promiseThu, 01 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0100

This catalog is published on the occasion of the four part series of exhibitions (May 2014 - March 2015), curated by Chris Sharp, which took place at Fondazione Giuliani, Roma (Italy); Le Parc St. Léger, Pougues-les-eaux (France); Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry- le Crédac, Ivry-sur-seine (France); De Kabinetten van De Vleeshal, Middelburg (The Netherlands).

A Curious Contortion in the Method of Progress – L’ellipse d’ellipsehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/a-curious-contortion-in-the-method-of-progress-l-ellipse-d-ellipsehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/a-curious-contortion-in-the-method-of-progress-l-ellipse-d-ellipseTue, 01 Jan 2013 00:00:00 +0100

In 2011, almost simultaneously, the Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein and the Institute for Contemporary Art in Villeurbanne are asking Bojan Šarčević to present his entire oeuvre in a museum for the first time. This happy conjunction immediately gave rise to the desire to bring together all possible forces. The present publication is a testimony to this and the first general presentation of the artist’s work to date.

Attraction étrangehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/attraction-etrangehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/attraction-etrangeTue, 01 Jan 2013 00:00:00 +0100

For their first artist’s book, Louise Hervé & Chloé (Clovis) Maillet draw inspiration from the American popular genre of the “pulp”—a genre mostly dedicated to fantastic literature and science–fiction—to present a first overview of their work. They commissioned a graphic illustrator to design a “pulp” cover and three authors to write curious short stories whose outlines are derived from their artworks and their recent exhibitions. Hervé & Maillet have also redesigned all of them as black & white illustrations to accompany their performance scripts and own texts such as the 19th-century-like serial story they published in 2012 in a regional newspaper. Fascinated by narrative processes and multi-layered (hi)stories, their book is a way to filter their practice through a literary genre they are familiar with.

Ivry Souterrainhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/ivry-souterrainhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/ivry-souterrainTue, 01 Jan 2013 00:00:00 +0100

Ivry Souterrain is a synthesis of the data that exists today on the subsoils of Ivry-sur-Seine. In ten chapters, the book deals with the different periods and strata of occupation, the networks and infrastructures: old quarries and cellars, underground tunnels, buried lakes, water, energy and telecommunications networks that draw a true “in-depth” portrait of the city.

This project received the financial support of Mondriaan Fund, Amsterdam, and Acción Cultural Española (AC/E).
With the careful support of Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris

L’Homme de Vitruvehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/l-homme-de-vitruvehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/l-homme-de-vitruveSun, 01 Jan 2012 00:00:00 +0100

Designed in conjunction with the new location occupied by Crédac since 2011 (the Manufacture des Œillets in Ivry), this catalogue brings together works on the industrial world, the gradual disappearance of workers’ skills, and social movements in factories past and present.

Hôtelhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/hotelhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/hotelSat, 01 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0100

Pierre Vadi describes his exhibitions as a kind of “hotel”, whose guests would be the works, hence the title of this book. They stay there for a period of time and then leave, waiting for the next invitation. This first major monograph on Pierre Vadi’s work brings together a number of his sculptures and the places they have had the opportunity to visit: Credac (Ivry), Mamco (Geneva), ribordy contemporary (Geneva), La Salle de bains (Lyon), Le Spot (Le Havre), the Swiss Institute (New York), Triple V (Dijon) and the Zoo gallery (Nantes).

Le Travail de rivièrehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/le-travail-de-rivierehttps://credac.fr/en/publications/le-travail-de-riviereFri, 31 Dec 2010 00:00:00 +0100

Le Travail de rivière (“the work of the river”) is built upon three archeologies: the topography of the venue that featured the exhibition and inspired it, i.e., the mazelike underground space of Crédac; the memory of the curator who organized the exhibition; and the nature of the works themselves.

Variations Continueshttps://credac.fr/en/publications/variations-continueshttps://credac.fr/en/publications/variations-continuesFri, 01 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0100

Variations Continues (Continuous Variations) is a concept linked to the heterogeneity of the artworks at the heart of a show that has been thought out as a continuous process. The artists Ayşe Erkmen, Füsun Onur et Seza Paker have brought this concept to bear in order to see both the space and their pieces collectively while preserving the personal dimension of their work, something that is indeed singular and unique to each artist.

Véronique Joumardhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/veronique-joumardhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/veronique-joumardFri, 01 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0100

Retrospective monograph: a survey of Véronique Joumard’s plays of light since 1985, with two essays and a conversation with the artist.

Vincent Lamourouxhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/vincent-lamourouxhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/vincent-lamourouxTue, 01 Dec 2009 00:00:00 +0100

First monograph: an overview of Lamouroux’s wide range of practices (installations, sculptures, works on paper, photos, videos…) and a retrospective of his large architectural installations conceived for the spaces of the Palais de Tokyo, Mamco, Centre Prompidou, etc., with two essays (including an original work by Marcelline Delbecq, comprising six texts specifically created for the book) and a conversation with the artist.

Laurent Grassohttps://credac.fr/en/publications/laurent-grassohttps://credac.fr/en/publications/laurent-grassoThu, 01 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0100

Conceived by the artist, an exhaustive monograph on Laurent Grasso’s body of work, that resumes in the graphic design and models in the approach of scientific manuals while bringing back to the surface the documents, pictures, and informations that served as hidden scripts in the artwork. The monograph catalogues all the projects from 1999 up to now, with 300 color illustrations.

Album 2005-07https://credac.fr/en/publications/album-2005-07https://credac.fr/en/publications/album-2005-07Mon, 01 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0100

This monograph documents the artist’s exhibitions since 2005, reflecting on the evolution and diversity of her work. The heterogeneous essays tracing her career are illustrated with exhibition views.

Delphine Coindethttps://credac.fr/en/publications/delphine-coindethttps://credac.fr/en/publications/delphine-coindetSun, 01 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0200

Large format monograph on the work of French artist Delphine Coindet in sculpture and drawing, with unpublished texts by Xavier Douroux, Michel Gauthier and Julien Fronsacq.

Cuzinhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/christophe-cuzinhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/christophe-cuzinThu, 01 Jun 2006 00:00:00 +0200

The book provides different points of view on the work: the perspective of an author, Alain Coulange, whose concerns intersect with those of the artist; that of exhibition curators and art critics who have shared projects with Christophe Cuzin in recent years; the artist’s drawings of projects completed from 1990 to today; and finally a series of vignettes documenting the exhibitions.

Jens Wolfhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/jens-wolfhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/jens-wolfSun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 +0100

First edition in French and English on the artist

La partie continue 3https://credac.fr/en/publications/la-partie-continue-3https://credac.fr/en/publications/la-partie-continue-3Wed, 01 Jun 2005 00:00:00 +0200

La partie continue is a project (two exhibitions, a catalogue) inspired at the outset by a place with a singular topography, a sloping « white-cube », and a contrasting geometry: Crédac, set in the foundations of one of the most famous exemple of Jean Renaudie’s architecture in Ivry-sur-Seine (1970-1975). This title carrries with it the notion of game, somewhere between continuity and discontinuity, losing and winning, check and checkmate.

Emmanuelle Villardhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/emmanuelle-villardhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/emmanuelle-villardFri, 01 Apr 2005 00:00:00 +0200

This catalogue was published on the occasion of Emmanuelle Villard’s exhibition Algamata in 2004 at Crédac.

Low commotionhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/low-commotionhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/low-commotionSat, 01 Jan 2005 00:00:00 +0100

The Norma Jean project at the Credac in 2003 dealt with a famous actress, Marilyn Monroe. For this project, Olivier Dollinger has chosen to capture under hypnosis the memory of a Hollywood icon. During the session, the voice of a hypnotiser urges actresses to slip into the idol’s skin. Slowly, the other, the icon-the character-her memory-her fantasy- is resuscitated.

Point of viewhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/point-of-viewhttps://credac.fr/en/publications/point-of-viewSat, 01 Jan 2005 00:00:00 +0100

Simone Decker’s first major monograph (work carried out between 1999 and 2004), whose work consists above all in large and small spatial interventions thanks to the illusion of scale made possible by the use of the photographic lens.

Public officehttps://credac.fr/en/bureau-des-publics/bureauhttps://credac.fr/en/bureau-des-publics/bureauThu, 01 Jan 1970 01:00:00 +0100Projetshttps://credac.fr/en/bureau-des-publics/projetshttps://credac.fr/en/bureau-des-publics/projetsThu, 01 Jan 1970 01:00:00 +0100